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The Secret to a Great Planning Process: Lessons From Airbnb and Eventbrite

Newsletter

The Secret to a Great Planning Process: Lessons From Airbnb and Eventbrite

Engineering Impact is a weekly newsletter that highlights trends in engineering leadership, productivity, culture, and scaling development teams.

This week features posts on: 

  • The Secret to a Great Planning Process
  • Candor, Bluntness, Impedance Matching – A Communication Scale
  • One-on-Ones Are My Most Valuable Meetings; Here’s How I Run Them
  • A Review Process
  • Autonomy != Anarchy

PLANNING

The Secret to a Great Planning Process: Lessons from Airbnb and Eventbrite

“Planning is hard because it’s inherently different from other exercises your organization takes on.” Here’s an in-depth framework to borrow fro m if you’re looking to revisit your organizational’s planning process or find ways to make it more effective.

Read the Full Post [23 min]

COMMUNICATION

Candor, Bluntness, Imedance Matching: A Communication Scale

Roy Rapoport (@royrapoport), Director – Data Engineering at Slack, with a thought exercise for mapping the communication styles of your organization, your team, and yourself so you can begin bridging the gap between the three.

Read the Full Post [5 mins]

MEETINGS

One-on-Ones Are My Most Valuable Meetings; Here’s How I Run Them

Mathilde Collin (@collinmatchilde), Co-founder and CEO at Front, shares the three kinds of 1:1 meetings they use—weekly, monthly, and bi-annual 1:1s—and provides helpful questions or tactics for getting the most out of each type of meeting. 

Read the full post [5 mins]

PROCESS

A Review Process

Cap Watkins (@cap) shares the structure and philosophy behind the review process in the BuzzFeed Tech org—complete with templates and answers to questions about how to handle particularly critical or watered-down feedback.

Read the full post [9 mins]

CULTURE

Autonomy != Anarchy

Here’s Dave Farley (@davefarley77), co-author of Continuous Delivery, with a short piece on why “autonomy” is widely misunderstood and how we can approach building autonomous teams in a healthier, more productive way.  He asks, “What is the correct scope for Autonomy? Is it the individual, the team the organization, or should everyone just do what I tell them to?” 

Read the full post [2 mins]